Our glossary explains many of the terms used or processes described in our site, such as in our home remedies, in greater detail.

Acidic

A chemical substance with a sour taste and pungent odour that turns the blue litmus's paper to red and which, in combination with a base, forms a salt. To be acidic, a substance must have a pH between 0 and 7.0.

Acuminata

Leaf with a thin toe.

Albuminuria

Presence of proteins in urine.

Alkene

Dry fruit with a single seed, not adhering to the pericarp.

Allopathic

A term introduced by the German physician Christian Friedrich Samuel Hahnemann, designating the methods of classical drug therapy, using active pharmacodynamic doses to combat causation, pathogenic changes and disease symptoms.

Analeptics

Central nervous system stimulants.

Analgesic

A drug substance that is administered for the pain-reducing or stopping effect.

Analgesics

Active principles that have the property of suppressing or diminishing the sensation of pain.

Analgetics

Active principles that have the property of suppressing or diminishing the sensation of pain.

Angina

Affection characterized by pain.

Angiocolitis

Inflammation of the gall bladder as a result of hepatic lithiasis or infectious diseases.

Anorexia

Severe lack of appetite.

Antidiabetics

Plant species with hypoglycemic action used as adjuvants in the treatment of diabetes.

Antidiarrheals

Herbal preparations with a high content in Tanin which by their astringent action precipitates proteins in the intestinal content, being used as adjuvants in the treatment of acute inflammatory diseases of the intestine.

Antiemetics

Active herbal substances that have the property of attenuating or removing nausea and vomiting by acting through several pharmacodynamic mechanisms.

Antihistamine

A class of medicines often used to relieve symptoms of allergies, allergic rhinitis, urticaria, conjunctivitis and insect bites.

Antiphlogistics

Plant species that have the property of reducing inflammation due to the presence of active principles.

Antiscorbutics

An ancient name for some species of plate that were used to combat scorbutus due to non-nutritional nutrition generally lacking in vitamins.

Antiseptics

Or antimicrobial. There are numerous plant species that contain either antibiotics or substances of another nature that have the property of destroying the microorganisms found on living animal tissue.

Antispasmodics

Active herbal substances that diminish or remove smooth muscle contractions from internal organs.

Aphrodisiacs

Species that stimulate sexual appetite.

Appetisers

Plant species that due to the active principles they contain they have the property of stimulating salivary secretions by reflex or direct gastric and intestinal secretions.

Aromatherapy

Therapy by ingestion, body massage or inhalation of essential oils or aromatic essences. aromatherapy is a branch of phytotherapy, treating diseases by plant-derived products.

Aromatic

Medicinal herbs containing volatile oils with specific pharmacodynamic action.

Arteritis

Inflammation or degeneration of the arteries.

Arthritis

Acute, subacute or chronic inflammation of the joints due to trauma or chronic infection.

Ascites

Fluid accumulation in the abdomen.

Astringents

Plants with local haemostatic action through the protein precipitation phenomenon.

Atherosclerosis

Affection that is characterized by the deposition of atheromas on the arterial walls of the kidney, brain, heart, and usually associated with arteriosclerosis.

Bactericidal

Substances that kill bacteria.

Behic

Plant species used as antitussive.

Bilabiate

Corolla type consisting of 2 labia.

Biliary

Gall bladder disorders.

Biodegradable

"Under the action of microorganisms in the presence of oxygen, decomposition of an organic chemical component into carbon dioxide, water and mineral salts of the other elements present (mineralization) and the emergence of a new biomass. In the absence of oxygen, decomposition into carbon dioxide, methane, mineral salts and the creation of a new biomass. according to SR EN 13432: 2002.

Bitter

Plant species that due to the active principles they contain they have the property of stimulating salivary secretions by reflex or direct gastric and intestinal secretions.

Bouquet

More flowers arranged and tied together.

Bracts

Modified leaves to protect some of the inflorescences.

Bradycardia

Physiological or pathological condition characterized by the frequency of heart beats and pulse respectively.

Bradypnea

Slow breathing.

Bulb

The underground strain formed by a disk from which the leaf leaves the deposit role.

Calyx

External floral wrap, made up of sepals totality.

Capsule

Dry dehiscent fruit that comes from a pluricarpelar ovary.

Cardiac

Regarding the heart.

Cardiorenal

Affections that involve concurrently the heart and kidney involvement.

Carminative

Plant species favoring the elimination of gas from the intestines.

Caryopsis

Dry indecisive fruit to which the pericarp adheres to the seed.

Cathartic

Purgatory strong.

Choleretic

Plants or active substances that stimulate secretions of liver cells and implicitly the volume of bile secreted.

Cima

Inflorescence consisting of different axes of order and ages.

Citric Acid

Tricarboxylic acid present as a colorless powder with a sour taste, slightly soluble in water.

Colitis

Large intestine diseases.

Conditions

Diseases of various organs or systems.

Conidiophores

Pedicel bearer of conidia.

Corolla

The second floral cover, made up of the petals.

Cystitis

Bladder inflammation.

Diaphoretic

Plant species that have the property of increasing sweat.

Diuretics

Plant species or pure active substances that act on the kidney epithelium by increasing the amount of urine eliminated over time.

Dyspepsia

Functional Digestive Disorders.

Dysuria

Difficulty in evacuating the bladder that occurs following a prostate adenoma, narrowing of the urethra or insufficient bladder muscle contraction.

Edema

Liquid accumulation in the intercellular space.

Emarginate

With the stirring tip.

Emetics

Plant species or pure active substances that act against vomiting.

Emollient

Plant species that by their active substances relax the tissues and diminish the inflammation.

Enuresis

Emission of involuntary and unconscious urine (generally nocturnal) in a child aged between 2 and 4 years.

Estrogen

Feminine hormones.

Expectorant

Plant species that favor expectoration.

Family (Plant Family)

A plant family is a collection of plants, grouped together, which share characteristics. Plants can be categorised by features such as appearance, their fruits, seeds (their size and number and whether they have a barry or capsule), the location of the seed pods, the shape of their flowers and so on, to illustrate their relationship to one another.

Filiform

Thin, thread-like.

Flatulence

Swallowing air with saliva or with food, resulting in stomach distention, bloating and epigastric gas.

Flavonoids

Class of secondary metabolites of the plants, known for their antioxidant properties.

Gastritis

Inflammation of the stomach lining.

Glomerule

Blooming made of flowers arranged very compact.

Gonorrhea

Gonococcal genital infection.

Headache

Long or intermittent pain of parts of the head often accompanied by other symptoms.

Hemostatic

That stops haemorrhaging.

Hepatomegaly

Enlargement of the liver, palpably under the right ribs.

Hermaphrodite

A flower that has both stamens and pistil.

Hormone

A substance secreted by an endocrine gland, released into the bloodstream and intended to act specifically on one or more target organs in order to modify their function.

Hull

The lower part of the pulp flower, coming from the welding of two petals.

Hull

Long elongated fruit that opens on two lines.

Hydopsy

Water retention in tissues.

Hypercholesterolemic

Excess cholesterol in blood.

Hyperhidrosis

Excessive sweating.

Hypermenorea

Menstrual abundance.

Hypnotics

Substances that favor the installation of sleep.

Infection

Invasion by microorganisms, localized or generalized, that by multiplication (with or without the secretion of toxins) leads to damage to the organism in question.

Inflammation

Immune response to an infection, irritation or injury.

Infusions

Aqueous solutions obtained by boiling plants for the purpose of extracting the active principles they contain.

Intestinal Flora

The totality of the germs that normally exists in the intestine.

Involucre

A group of bracts that surrounds and protects some inflorescences.

Lanceolate

Sharpened, spear-shaped.

Latex

Milky juice.

Laxative

Light purgative.

Leaflets

Components of composite leaves that catch on a common shaft.

Meteorism

Accumulation of gas in the intestine leading to abdominal volume growth, present in digestive organic diseases and in functional diseases (only digestive function is impaired).

Metritis

Inflammation of the uterus.

Metrorrhagia

Uterine bleeding between menstrual periods.

Micturition

Natural emission of urine by evacuation through the bladder.

Multisperm

Fruit with many seeds.

Mycelium

All the filaments of a mushroom.

Myocardial Infarction

Necrosis of a region of the myocardium (the heart muscle) as a result of a sudden obstruction of a coronary artery.

Narcotic

General anesthetic.

Nectarios

Formation that secretes nectar.

Nephritis

Inflammation of the kidney.

Panic Attacks

Feelings of fear or intense anxiety, suddenly occurring, causing acceleration of heart rate, rapid and short breathing, loss of control.

Panicle

Composed inflorescence, consisting of a spoonful of spicules.

Pectoral Angina

Affection manifested by pain in the region of the heart or retrosternal that radiates in the left arm and that usually is accompanied by fear.

Peduncle

Cylindrical portion of flower or fruit support.

Perennial

Who lives and carries for many years, having a persistent root from which a new strain develops every spring.

Pericarp

The ensemble of tissues that make up the wall of the fruit.

Pharmacopoeias

Book that describdrugs, chemicals, and medicinal preparations.

Photophobia

Excessive sensitivity to light.

Phytotherapy

A science-based medical practice and thus is distinguished from other, more traditional approaches, such as medical herbalism, which relies on an empirical appreciation of medicinal herbs and which is often linked to traditional knowledge.

Pituitary Gland

A small organ in the form of a pea, located at the base of the brain, near the base of the nasal bridge.

Rhizome

Cylindrical underground stem.

Sebum

Yellowish-white substance, mostly made of lipids (predominantly triglyceride type). Sebum lubricates the skin, protects it from humidity and dryness, maintains its suppleness and participates in the protection against microbes (bacteria and microscopic fungi).

Secretions

Liquid or solid products resulting from glandular cell activity.

Sheath

The base part of the leaf that catches the stem.

Vermifuge

Agent that destroys or expels parasitic worms.

Volatile

Substance that evaporates slightly at ordinary temperatures; volatilizable.